Legislative

Please select your area of interest:

•    State Legislation California is at the epicenter of dramatically expanding Indian casino gaming across the nation. This includes a number of new incursions into urban areas driven by landless or rural area tribes shopping for land in or near cities that can be put into trust and used to site huge new casinos. 
Read more below…
•    Federal Legislation Some federal lawmakers are determined to modify federal Indian gaming regulations due to growing concerns nationwide that loopholes in the law are allowing some tribes to impose casinos on local communities that don’t want them. Read more below…

State Legislation

California is at the epicenter of dramatically expanding Indian casino gaming across the nation. This includes a number of new incursions into urban areas driven by landless or rural area tribes shopping for land in or near cities that can be put into trust and used to site huge new casinos.

In 1998, Californians passed proposition 1A to help tribes economically and to allow tribal casinos to operate on existing Indian reservations, mostly in rural areas away from large urban centers. Today, 26 Indian casinos are in operation, with many more on the drawing boards.

At least 44 tribes in California are interested in acquiring government – sanctioned reservation lands. Tribes increasingly are looking to cities and other non-reservation sites to open casinos. The situation is acute in the East Bay, where three casinos already are proposed within a few miles of each other. This clearly illustrates the growing concerns over Indian gaming expansion and the implications of reservation shopping that will continue to multiply exponentially if left unchecked. In order to protect California’s local communities, legislators need to stop urban casinos now, or you may find one in your backyard.
California legislators are currently taking action 
to stop urban casinos
Assemblymember Loni Hancock (D-Berkley) bill A.B. 2412 would require specific counties to hold an advisory election to allow voters to voice their opinions on the establishment of urban casinos. The bill would also mandate reimbursement of all financial costs imposed on the county.
Assemblymember Joe Nation (D-San Rafael) bill A.C.A. 35 would prohibit the Governor to enter into a compact with the tribe for the operation of any tribal gaming activity within city limits of tribal land as of January 1, 2000, unless that tribal gaming activity has been approved by city officials, the board of supervisors, and the county’s voters.
Assemblymember Joe Nation (D-San Rafael), Gene Mullin (D-S. San Francisco) bill A.C.A. 15 would prohibit the Governor from concluding gaming compacts until January 1, 2008, allowing the Commission on Gaming to study and review all aspects of gaming in California.

We will continue discussion about this topic on the next page. Please join us.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *